Harnessing the value of clinical and business intelligence is a priority among most healthcare organizations, as organizations become more accountable for patient health and interoperability pressure rise. Most healthcare leaders are limited to their siloed data and disconnected technologies.

In a few short weeks, HIMSS17 will host hundreds of educational and networking event; a topic paramount among them, clinical and business intelligence.

For attendees looking to find some out-of-the-box solutions for these challenges, they can stop by the iVEDiX Booth 2387 on the exhibit floor at the Orange County Convention Center. This exhibit will feature expert talks on the health IT landscape, demos of the latest technology, and hands-on activities.

HIMSS17 will also host a variety of educational sessions to focus on current clinical and business intelligence, including:

USING SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH TO POWER RISK CONTRACTS

The role of individual social determinants of health (SDOH) in driving avoidable medical costs, especially in the lower income populations, has been established in numerous studies. While there are isolated examples of using SDOH in providing clinical care, current workflows of providers are not equipped to integrate such input into personalized care management and power risk contracts. We showcase an analytical “companion diagnostic” that integrates social determinants and drives towards personalized patient care. This session will show how providers and payers can use existing social determinant data in EHRs and elsewhere to better prioritize patients and identify what care programs will be most effective for each patient or patient population. This interactive session will allow the audience to explore populations from several use cases and drill down into insights from an EHR database of about 500,000 patients across 15 states to uncover relationships between social drivers and health outcomes.
When: February 20, 10:30AM
Where: 207C

A MODEL OF DATA MATURITY TO SUPPORT PREDICTIVE ANALYTICS

The use of data, like many processes in healthcare and other industries, tends to follow a maturity progression path from basic, operationally-based, retrospective metrics to advanced, strategically-focused, prospective decision-making. The journey toward data use maturity requires support and an advanced data infrastructure that increasingly must deliver real-time analysis. Certain skills and expertise are needed to facilitate business units and service lines along this path and to support their increasingly complex data requests. This requires an increasingly close collaboration and a partnership between the service lines and the data production pipeline. Examine how the University of Virginia Health System is tackling this problem to create an agile analytics capability.
When: February 20, 12:00PM
Where: 207C

ANALYTICS-DRIVEN EVIDENCE BASED CARE AT PROVIDENCE HEALTH

The ‘triple aim initiative’ of healthcare seeks to improve population health and enhance patient experience while decreasing cost. The Providence Brain and Spine Institute (PBSI) designed and implemented a healthcare analytics initiative for partner sites that addresses national standards in acute stroke care. To meet those standards, PBSI partners were empowered with contextualized and benchmarked data for monitoring, measuring and improving stroke care in their facilities, leading to superior patient outcomes.
When: February 21, 08:30AM
Where: 204A

PHYSICIAN PERFORMANCE ANALYTICS – A KEY TO COST SAVINGS

With value-based payment models becoming more prevalent and physicians being the lynchpin of healthcare, their approach, care patterns and outcomes can affect healthcare providers’ performance in these models. Unbiased physician performance analytics provides the tools for physicians, providers and payers to identify overuse, underuse and misuse in physician performance that impacts medical costs and patient outcomes. In value-based payment models, especially bundled payments, providers are looking for ways to cut costs while maintaining or improving quality. This session will describe how to implement unbiased physician performance analytics to uncover the factors impacting physician performance, how the results can be used to guide strategic decisions for improvements and predict future physician performance. The ability to evaluate physicians with no bias facilitates improving physician performance, reducing costs and improving patient care.
When: February 21, 10:00AM
Where: Tangerine Ballroom, F3

USING DATA TO INCREASE CAPACITY IN AMBULATORY CARE

Patient populations are rapidly increasing across all outpatient settings, with provider organizations struggling to keep pace. The trend today is to build new brick and mortar to accommodate more patients, yet health systems are doing so with little data to support the necessity or inform design. In an extreme case study that holds lessons for any organization struggling with capacity, the COO of Nor-Lea Hospital District shares how their clinic dealt with a 78% increase in patient population over just two years. Learn how the clinic used real-time locating system (RTLS) technology to gather data on wait times, room utilization, provider time with patients and more, and how they used this data to engage staff for process and workflow improvement. The results are impressive; the clinic increased capacity by nearly 50% in the same footprint, while using the same data to plan a new clinic building that has won awards for workflow and design.
When: February 22, 10:00AM
Where: 207C

SEMANTIC DATA ANALYSIS FOR INTEROPERABILITY

We’ve spent the last decade working to ensure that we can interconnect our healthcare systems, treating the problem as a technical or connectivity issue. With data combined, we’re now seeing that the real problem is one of identifying or establishing shared meaning across all of that data: semantics. This presentation explains the various structural, syntactic and semantic issues that arise with healthcare data sharing and consolidation, and offers a strategy for data curation that enhances the semantic shared meaning of data across and among institutions.
When: February 22, 11:30AM
Where: 207C

SMART ALERTS IN HEALTHCARE: REAL AS NEVER BEFORE

In recent years, alarm hazards (e.g., excessive alarms, missed alarms, delayed alarms, etc.) was ranked as the #1 health technology hazard by the ECRI (Emergency Care Research Institute). EHR provides an unprecedented opportunity to use syndrome surveillance technology for the development of “smart alarms”. This session will address “Failure to rescue” concept in clinical diagnostic alerts and also will outline the problem of information overload from unnecessary multiple clinical alerts while presenting some key potential steps to address this issue.
When: February 23, 10:30AM
Where: 207C

ENABLING ADVANCED EHR ANALYTICS WITH CLINICAL TERMINOLOGY

A logically designed clinical terminology enables enhanced EHR analytics to deliver timely and accurate clinical and business intelligence and improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of healthcare delivery. SNOMED CT is a globally-used clinical terminology that is freely available to US users through NLM and is designated for problem representation by the 2014 EHR certification criteria. This session will focus on a variety of approaches using SNOMED CT to address different clinical analytics use cases, such as historical summaries, clinical decision support, population health and clinical research, along with an overview of guidance developed during a study of analytics deployments. The session will also cover practical experience from EHR vendors, healthcare provider organizations and other stakeholders, including benefits realization and challenges.
When: February 23, 12:00PM
Where: 207C

HIMSS17 runs from Feb. 19-23, 2017 at the Orange County Convention Center.